Lionel pw-2338

MILWAUKEE ROAD GP-7

 

This engine was available in 1955 and 1956. It was a vailable for separate sale, as well as the engine in O27 outfit 2235W in 1955 and in outfits 1553W and 1559W in 1956. All three of these sets featured an attractive and colorful train of freight cars. Although it started in 1955 as an O Gauge engine, it was downgraded to O27 in 1956. Despite being categorized as an O27 engine, it was d efinitely a premium offering. It featured the typical Pullmor motor, Magne-Traction, three-position reverse unit, an operating horn (requires a D Cell battery for operation), die cast trucks and operating couplers at both ends.
  • Most 2338s have an orange, unpainted shell with black painted on after and rubber stamped markings. The very first production run of these engines had a translucent, orange body shell and is very rare. Please keep reading below to learn the difference between the five main variations.
  • VARIATION A--HiGloss orange that is painted black. The orange band goes all the way aound the shell. The red rubberstamped railroad herald did not adhere very well on this variation. This variation was an early produciton run and is rare. Numberous fakes exist that had had the black paint removed from the cab of the common variation. VARIATION B-- Hi Gloss orange body that is painted black. The orange stripe ends at the cab and begins again. The interior is also painted entirely in black. This was a stop gap measure that lionel used to stop the interior illumination from bleeding thru the orange plastic. VARIATION C-- Black body that is painted Dull orange and flat black. The black body stopped bleed thru from the interior lights. This variation is hard to find. VARIATION D-- Opaque orange body painted black. Orange stripe stops at cab with a dard red RR hearld rubber satamped on the cab. VARIATION E-- Identical to Var. D except with High Gloss Black paint.
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